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No barriers in reading

With the increasing popularity of realism in literature, fiction, it seems, has taken a back seat. But here is a book that ventures into the depths of imagination, a work of pure fiction. Rajkamal Prakashan has launched the Hindi translation of Jack Harte's "From Under Gogol's Nose". Called "Pyramid ka Sapna", this collection of short stories by the Irish author has been translated by Ashok Vajpayee and Purushottam Agrawal.

Pure fiction

Purushottam Agrawal, the mind behind the exercise, says, "Literature is concurrent with truth even when there is an attached ambiguity, multi-vocality and the varying perceptions associated with it. Literary writing has an indispensable insistence on truth and that is reflected in Jack's work. Revealing human emotions, this work of pure fiction has a controlled sense of humour as well without forcing the reader into the consequences." H.K. Keiran Dowling, the Irish ambassador to India, says, "Ireland has produced literary figures like George Bernard Shaw and Y.B. Yeats. This industry has immensely contributed to Indo-Irish relations. Jawaharlal Nehru was greatly inspired by the writings and life of Shaw. Recently, the respective governments, in a bid to foster stronger relations, reached a cultural co-operation agreement. Many conferences and cultural exchanges would be organised in the near future for exchange of ideas and intellectual development." Ashok Vajpayee, the translator, reflects, "There have been many translations but this one is unique in style as it holds the same emotions. Though a work of fiction, it portrays ordinary people in ordinary situations caught in the complexities of life."

A campaigner for labour rights, Jack never considered his stories as an instrument of social activism. Vajpayee says, "Novels are popular in Ireland but since the `60s the popularity of short stories has been on a decline. But, it is still a vibrant medium in Hindi and is appreciated."

Engage in an enthralling journey of dreams with this book.

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