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Chords and Notes


APNA SAPNA MONEY MONEY

Tips Rs.150

Fun films usually don't have music that has a standalone value. Apna Sapna... is no different. After the recent successes, here Pritam seems to be on a break. It opens with "Jai Jai Money". It's a loud number by Sukhvinder Singh with some unusual voices as chorus, a Pritam's forte. The trick doesn't work in "Gustakh Nigah" either where Alisha Chinoy tries to lend the novelty factor. The different voice, however, works in "Dil Mein Baji Guitar" sung by Mika. The number will stay on charts for some time. Another song, which is impressive is "Paisa Paisa" rendered by Suzzanne D'mello and Humza. It goes with the mood of the film. Overall, the music's life depends on the film's box office performance.


HAZARON KHWAHISHEIN

Music Today, Rs.295

This album, Hazaron Khwahishein (A Thousand Desires), featuring Shujaat Hussain Khan's sitar and voice, fills one with a thousand hopes. Shujaat, with his mellifluous voice and dexterity over the sitar, has developed a unique style of presentation, and his concerts in which he sings Sufi and folk poetry along with his playing are a big hit with audiences.

The album, though good, is also a bit disappointing. The first offering, "Chaap Tilak", keeps the promise, lilting and melodious. Thereafter a certain sameness sets in, of melody and gait as well. Well known compositions like "Man Qunto Maula" and "Aaj Rang Hai" besides the title song are featured. There are occasional off-notes. Though fleeting, they are jarring enough to the ear, and not something one has come to expect from this expert sitar exponent, son of the late Ustad Vilayat Khan. His sitar interjections are however impeccable. In this recording, Shujaat is accompanied by tabla, acoustic guitar and drums. The guitar though is not very audible.


TAGORE IN SYMPHONY

Sa Re Ga Ma, Rs.175

Tagore in Symphony: The Seasons of India, one would guess from the name is a stab at representing the words of Tagore through music, or so it says in the inlay. This album consists of music that tries to speak of the six seasons of India according to Rabindranath Tagore's description of them. For example, the album starts with Greeshma (Summer). The second track committed to it is based on the words "a time of dry days and scorching heat, of withering garlands and mirages."

The music throughout the experience is poetic yet slightly melodramatic. The constant use of chordophonic instruments is a bit overdone, just violins and flute mostly. The melodies are also rather just shades apart, so the variety is lacking. But the point is to match the mood to the seasonal change and the change of the ambience. There is a complete lack of it xcept for "Amar nayano bhulano ele". But all in all this is worth the listen, it can put you in the mood after a tiring day or slow afternoon.


AITBAAR: SHAEL

Universal Rs.125

Shael seems to have taken the term "flat note" rather seriously.

When the opening song itself - nothing less than the title track, mind you - is pretty vapid, you know what to expect from the rest of the album. An unimpressive blend of Punjabi pop and hip-hop, the current rage on the music circuit, seems to be the centrepiece of this offering by Universal Music Group.

Hinged on nasal vocals and run-of-the-mill tunes, not even one of the eight songs manages to hold its own. Neither the rap in "Kaate Kate" and "Nachle Soniye Tu", nor the English lyrics in "Seven Days" are original enough to salvage the album. The last track, "Umar Bhar", is the most tolerable of the lot, though the tune is noGrammy material.

A very forgettable album, unless you've got nothing better to hear.

(COMPILED BY A.R AND A.K)

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