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Creepy, but cool

Launch Of Ramendra Kumar’s ‘Terror in Fun City’

Photo: R. Ravindran

spinning a fine yarn Ramendra Kumar

At the function to launch Ramendra Kumar’s ‘Terror in Fun City’ at Landmark, Nungambakkam, a middle-aged gentleman in the audience remained oblivious to what was happening around him. The only movement was the constant turning of pages, as he seemed determined to finish the tale of four children and their dog. Ramen would be thrilled if all his readers reacted the way he did.

‘Terror in Fun City’, Ramendra Kumar’s 16th book, revolves around Aryan, Neil, Tanya and Imran, and their dog Tiger, who call themselves the Titans. Their mission statement is “When you think of trouble-shooting, think of Titans.” From a conversation that Aryan picks up at a hospital, they get drawn into a chilling plot that will lead to the death of many innocent lives. The Titans set out on a hunt for a terror group and soon become the hunted. What follows is a trail of suspense and action.

N.V. Subbaraman, Editor of Young Poet and chief guest for the evening, was so impressed by the book and the author that he ended up giving away the plot of the story. Even that could not wipe the smile from Ramendra Kumar’s face, as he sat beaming smiling at his daughter and the other children in the audience. Ramen, as he is popularly known, writes in many genres, including fiction, non-fiction, satire, fables and poetry.

His books have been translated into many Indian languages and into Sinhalese and Japanese as well. One of his stories has been adapted as Kamishibai, a traditional form of story-telling in Japan, while another has been included in the text book for ninth grade students in Norway.

“I started writing this book in 2004 and had to put in a lot of research to know how terrorist groups functioned. After I started writing the book, a few incidents mentioned in it actually took place,” said Ramen. “But that does not mean I am linked to any of the terror groups,” he quickly added.

Writer, playwright and poet Shreekumar Varma was the first to receive the copy and he drew comparison to Enid Blyton’s ‘Five Find-Outers and Dog.’ “Writing for children is difficult as they are keen and sceptical and I congratulate Ramen for his effort,” he added.

When excerpts from the book were being read, the younger ones seemed engrossed, while the older ones travelled back to the time when they were kids.

PRIYADARSHINI PAITANDY

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