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Tough queries

Author Mallika Chopra decodes parenting in today’s world



No kids tales these Mallika Chopra, the author of “100 promises To My Baby”

Why the sunlight weaves rainbows over the mountain rivers; why ghosts can’t be seen; why the shadow wouldn’t leave us — wondered children in the last century amidst their pursuit of beautiful butterflies.

But the modern day child’s queries go beyond these simple questions and require deft tackling. U.S.-based author Mallika Chopra realised this when one not-so-fine morning — 26/7, the day of London bombing — when her three-year-old daughter asked her what a bomb was.

“It was at that point I realised that answering such questions required soul searching,” says Chopra. The author of “100 Promises to My Baby” came out with another book, “100 Questions from My Child”.

Published by Roli, it is a memoir of her experiences in bringing up her daughters, Tara and Leela.

Facing a dilemma

Written over the span of a year, it comprises 100 chapters, each of which describes a question in its real context. At places, it brings forth the author’s consternation at the child’s observations and her dilemma in answering certain queries.

Modern-day parents are likely to find themselves in situations where they have to mould their explanations about the realities of the world to make them suitable for children’s fantasy-filled, innocent notions about people and things .

Emotional nurturing

However, that is only half the reason why she wrote book. “While I was pregnant with Tara, I was rummaging through a lot of books on parenting and child care. But I was disappointed to find that not many of them dealt with the emotional and spiritual side of parenting.”

Living in a multi-cultural society in the U.S, Chopra finds it important to inculcate a feeling of being global citizens in her children as they become concerned with their identity (“Am I Indian or American,” asked Tara; Chapter 7).

“I wanted to share stories and connect with others,” sums up the author.

ASIM KHAN

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