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Political content dominates their films

Synonymous with success, entertainment and sharp political dialogues, Paruchuri Brothers are still going strong after over three decades in the industry

Photo: C.V. Subrahmanyam

Creative siblings The Paruchuri Brothers

In the Telugu cinema industry for a long time now, the name of writers Paruchuri Brothers- Venkateswara Rao, 66, and Gopalakrishna, 62, - is synonymous with success, entertainment and sharp political dialogues. With 325 films to their credit in a career spanning more than three decades, they are still going strong. They began their writing with Chalicheemalu in 1978, in which Nutan Prasad played a wily politician. Gopalakrishna became known with Maro Malupu, a film on social conditions and caste. Since then they have never looked back.

Recently in Visakhapatnam for a programme, they spoke to The Hindu MetroPlus on a range of topics that concern their writing for films.

The main task of film writers is to bring audience to the theatre. With women who constitute majority audience glued to the TV, it’s only youth and masses that are the target audience, says Gopalakrishna. He makes a major distinction between today’s films and the golden days when NTR and other stalwarts straddled the screen. “Histrionics are the mainstay giving scope for powerful dialogues. Actors like NTR, Krishna, Sarada and Mohanbabu made all the difference. But over a period of time, the story became less important and the technique of story telling gained an upper hand,” says Gopalakrishna. Any attempt at serious dialogues is getting a thumbs down in cinema halls. If anything of that nature is conveyed, it has to be simple or in English as it has to cater to the youth.

Dialogues like “Kantichoopu to champestha,” or “Ammathodu, addamga narikestha,” have become a rage. “But they are violent,” admits Gopalakrishna.

On political content dominating their films, he said prior to Paruchuri brothers entering the field, ‘vidhi’ (destiny), the rich or Suryakantham (read the nagging, querulous mother-in-law) were the villains. “With us, it is always politics, law and justice that reflect conditions in society. If a Communist government is in power, it will prescribe dialogues in Adavilo Anna as a textbook,” is the compliment paid by another writer Tanikella Bharani, Gopalakrishna proudly recalls. The two brothers play character roles and Gopalakrishna terms his portrayal of Balagam Sitayya as that of a typical politician.

Satire has always been their forte. Even NTR appreciated them though a dialogue on retirement age criticized him. (NTR Government drew flak for lowering retirement age), he elaborates.

Two forthcoming films, Adhineta, starring Jagapathibabu and Mahatma with Srikant in the lead are out and out political films. Adhineta is likely to hit screens before the elections and Jagapathibabu plays a full length role as politician.

Favourites

Paruchuri brothers consider the Vijayasanthi-starrer Karthavyam as their most original story and script. “Though it is based on the real life persona of Kiran Bedi, the country’s first IPS officer, it created a powerful character and the problems police officials face,” Gopalakrishna says.

To buttress their point that politics and action draw audience and any attempt at realistic portrayal is not met with the same success, they point out the response to Asayam, another Vijayasanthi film that followed Kartavyam though everyone in the Press liked it. In films not written by them, Sitaramakalyanam is the brothers’ favourite. Gopalakrishna adds Devadas, Manavudu-Danavudu, Alluri Sitaramaraju and Venkateswara Rao, Sankarabharanam.

Among their films, they like Ee Charita Ye Sirato, Khaidi, that gave Chiranjeevi the evergreen rebel image, and Krishna’s political film Eenadu. “Just as we were wondering whether the days of mass films were over, Samarasimha Reddy, Narasimha Naidu and Indra came along that were smashing hits and our favourites,” he adds. In Prajarajyam, the writers portrayed their father’s struggle as farmer and for the first time mooted the idea of ryot bazaars. Both plump for Acharya Athreya’s dialogues in Premnagar as their favourite.

G.V. PRASADA SARMA

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