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A curvy choice

Size Zero is a passe with a growing number of women going curve crazy, says Harjeet Kaur Allagh

Photo: Rajeev Bhatt

Altering choices Kareena Kapoor wants it back

“Curves are back” announced Volkswagen when it re-launched its iconic Beetle. Fitness fanatics like Kareena Kapoor, famous for her size zero status, seem to have taken cue from it and are working hard to get back what they'd lost in the last few years –their curves.

Pre-2010, size zero was a fad with celebrities like the younger Kapoor girl, Nicole Richie, Posh Spice and the likes flaunting it like never before. Thin petite beauties were in, becoming an overnight obsession for many around them.

But as the fixation began to wear thin, many youngsters are seen deviating from it. “I want my curves back” declared Bollywood diva Kareena Kapoor. After creating a sensation with her size zero status; she now wants her original sensuous curvy figure back. “I think I look nicer with them. Even Saif says I look better that way,” the actor says echoing thoughts of most men who like flesh on their women!

What exactly is a healthy curvy body? “A BMI (Body Mass Index – the proportion calculated between height and weight) between 18.1 to 22 for adults is good,” says Praneeta, a dietician. “Also the weight of the body should be the right balance of water, fat and muscle mass. This varies from person to person depending on the BMI.”

“The Indian anatomy is essentially curvaceous and it is almost criminal to chop them into a size zero through aggressive weight loss and manic workouts. But if you're skinny and aiming for curves, then your diet should include 250-300 calories every day from complex carbs like bread, bananas, milk and nuts and proteins like chicken and eggs,” says Kiran, a nutritionist.

Movies and soaps are doing their own bit of harm by portraying thin women as go-getters, successful and popular while the heavier or those with over-weight are portrayed as gluttons becoming the butt of everybody's jokes. With pencil-thin models and actresses ruling the industry, from endorsing consumer goods to dancing to item numbers in movies, the emaciated and starved look has gained popularity.

Grinning at the burgeoning number of people altering their lifestyle to accommodate daily workouts, several new gyms have mushroomed in every nook and cranny of the city, doing a roaring business with women of all ages engaged in a fierce battle of the bulge to acquire that anorexic, reed thin figure.

Size zero has sparked low self-esteem issues, resulting in anorexia and body dimorphic disorders.

Looking thin is like being a poster girl for sickness and bad health. It's more important to be fit than be thin and look sick. "The term size zero is a gimmick to sell certain products in the market," says Anil Kumar, owner of a local ad agency. One might argue that men, the largest group of female admirers on the planet, have never needed a law to be passed in order to enjoy full-figured women.

Following the lead of Australia, Italy and Spain, France is also passing a legislation that will ban promotion of extreme thinness on international ramps.

A Kate Moss or a Twiggy will have to get their curves in place to walk the runways! While catwalk girls will always be thin, there has been a bit more bounce lately in the bottoms and flesh on the bones of models who walk in London, Paris, New York and Milan.

Top heroines of Telugu film industry like Vanisree, Sridevi and Jayaprada have been voluptuous beauties.

An Amala or a Genelia, though won hearts, could not change the popular mindset. That's precisely why the bevy of curvaceous beauties like Ileana, Kamalini Mukherjee or Charmi have a die-hard fan following. A new research says girls dieting for a size zero could be risking their bones to long-term problems such as osteoporosis. So eat, drink and put on the pounds because curves are in.

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