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Savour sage

A flavourful soup that combines the goodness of sage and carrot



Health-giving herb Sage

Sage, which has a sweet, yet savoury flavour, has been prized for millennia for its health-promoting properties.

Sage leaves are greyish-green in colour and have a silvery bloom covering.

They are lance-shaped and feature prominent veins running throughout the leaf.

Sage is available fresh or dried, either whole, rubbed (slightly ground) or in powder form.

Sage is native to countries surrounding the Mediterranean Sea and has been consumed in these regions for thousands of years.

Whenever possible, choose fresh sage over the dried form since it is superior in flavour.

The leaves should look fresh, and be free from darks spots or yellowing.

If you are buying dried sage, try to select organically-grown sage since you know it has not been irradiated.

Storage

While storing fresh sage in the refrigerator, wrap the leaves in a damp paper towel and place inside a loosely closed plastic bag.

It will keep fresh for several days.

Dried sage should be kept in a tightly-sealed glass container in a cool, dark and dry place; it will keep fresh for about six months.

Since the flavour of sage is very delicate, it is best to add the herb near the end of the cooking process so that it retains its essence.

Nutritional profile

Like rosemary, sage contains a variety of volatile oils, flavonoids, and phenolic acids. The rosmarinic acid in sage and rosemary also functions as an anti-oxidant.

The leaves and stems of the sage plant also contain anti-oxidant enzymes.

All these lend sage the ability to prevent oxygen-based damage to the cells.

Now, for a recipe.

Carrot And Sage Soup

Ingredients

Olive oil: 30 ml

Onion (chopped): 40 gm

Garlic (crushed): a clove

Sage (fresh or dried): 10 gm

Carrots (chopped): 450 gm

Potato (chopped): 60 gm

Yeast extract: 15 ml

Cashew nuts (chopped): 70 gm

Salt and freshly-ground black pepper: To taste

Vegetable stock: 500 ml

Method

Heat the oil, add the onion and sauté gently.

Add the garlic, sage, carrots, potato and yeast extract, and continue cooking for a few minutes until the carrot softens.

Add the stock and simmer for about 20 minutes. Stir in the cashew nuts.

Season, allow to cool slightly and puree in a food processor or blender before serving.

CHEF BHOLANATH JHA

Junior Sous Chef

Vivanta By Taj-Connemara

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