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Music Season
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Music Season

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MUSIC ACADEMY

Melody sans ambiguity

SULOCHANA PATTABHIRAMAN

Nedunuri Krishnamurthi, with years of being immersed in the art, came up trumps in his Thodi elaboration.

Photo:M. Vedhan.

THINKING MOOD: Nedunuri Krishnamurthi.

It was a full house for the morning concert of Nedunuri Krishnamurthi at the Music Academy. The Mohanam kriti of Tyagaraja, `Bhavanutha' has always enjoyed a pride of place in the vidwan's repertoire.

The swaras affixed to the pallavi with felicity of expression was of superb quality expected from the vidwan.

The Bhairavi alapana, short and sweet, was able to register conviction. `Nee Vanti Deivamu' of Tyagaraja, without the appendage of mind-boggling swaras, was a pack of melody with involved interpretation.

`Mathangi Sri Rajarajeshwari' in Ramaamanohari by Dikshitar had assertive swaraprastaras backed by the seasoned percussionists, K.V.Prasad on the mridangam and T.V.Vasan on the ghatam. Nagai Muralidharan, the violinist, has a praiseworthy classical calibre and his output throughout the programme proved that his solid artistic faculty is reinforced with ready anticipation and an eye for detail.

Thodi is acknowledged as the king of Carnatic ragas because of its varying sruti values even for a single swara, and it is a fact that a musician who paints a picture of Thodi with melodic inputs sans ambiguity, is on the right track to make a dent in the performing sphere.

Nedunoori, with years and years of being immersed in the art, came up trumps in his Thodi elaboration.

He synthesised with much sensitivity and imagination the fine, subtle nuances of the raga.

The violin vidwan covering the entire spectrum of the melody with stress on slow phrases initially, and then moving on to the madhyamakala and dhurita prayogas was indicative of confidence that flows naturally where there is a thinking mind.

`Chesinadella,' another favourite of the vidwan, the niraval for the words `Rama Sri Tyagaraja Premaavathaara' and the kalpanaswaras were, to describe in advertising parlance, `Always classic, always contemporary'.

Muralidharan's responses were positive in terms of bhava and laya. The thani avartanam was as expected embroidered with a plethora of rich rhythmic threads that spelt virtuosity.

`Sringara Lahari' by Lingappa Naidu in Neelambari with its captivating chittaswaram and suppleness of oral expression, was a compendium of mellifluence.

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Music Season

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