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Friday, September 21, 2001

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dated September 21, 1951: British Monarch ill:

Former Emperor of India, and ruler of Britain, King George VI, was stated to be rather seriously ill, and visited by specialist doctors. An announcement from Buckingham Palace in London said the King ailed from a lung disorder, and might require prolonged treatment. Sir Robert Young, a lung specialist, and Dr. Clement Prince Thomas, a surgeon especially experienced in treating tuberculosis of the lung, had been added to the regular panel of doctors treating the ailing monarch.

The King was up and about in his private apartments, while an anxious nation speculated on the gravity of his illness. A carefully worded bulletin on his health gave little clue even to medical men. To, some specialists the wording of the bulletin indicated that the nature and extent of the illness had yet to be fully diagnosed. A lung specialist said that one thing could he said for sure: ``certain structural changes in a lung'' are mentioned as present. Those changes could be the outcome from a number of diseases.

King George was due to go on a visit to Australia early in 1952. Mr. E. J. Harrison, Australian Minister put in-charge of arrangements for the royal tour, said in Sydney that preparations for the tour were going forward in full expectation that His Majesty would travel as planned.

Vincent Sheean on U.S. Resentment of India:

In an article titled, `The Case for India', Vincent Sheean, noted American writer and author of `Lead Kindly Light', a book on Mahatma Gandhi, said in the latest issue of `Foreign Affairs' that Mr. Jawaharlal Nehru and the Government of India he led represented ``an ideal force indispensable to all who believe in freedom.'' Mr. Sheean said that American resentment at India's policy at the United Nations had commenced with the crossing by U.N. forces of the 38th Parallel in Korea; and, ``since December 1950, the store of American goodwill towards India seems to have diminished and partly dissipated.'' The complaints against Indian policy in the U.S. were listed by the author as: Mr. Nehru's giving recognition to Mao Tse-tung before anybody else, and India's championing of Communist China's claim to a seat in the U.N. due to Mr. Nehru's weakness for Communism. ``Below that level, the complaints trail off into absurdity. ...The blatant truth is that the United States made no serious attempt earlier to keep Britain and India from recognising Mao Tse-tung,'' Mr. Sheean said.

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