Online edition of India's National Newspaper
Friday, Jan 18, 2002

About Us
Contact Us
Entertainment Published on Fridays

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Folio |

Entertainment

A fine blend


Anwesha... old world charm.

URMILA SATYANARAYANAN is a good dancer - not just good but veers on excellence. So it was rather pleasant to discover that she turns out to be a good teacher too if her student Anwesha Das's recital is any indication.

It was an evening when the Mylapore Fine Arts auditorium was empty - if some seats filled up eventually, it was a bonus. But that did not bother 15-year-old Anwesha who did justice to the opportunity given to her. It was also an evening when music, dance and aesthetics blended to produce a very good show. Beginning with a Pushpanjali in Hamasadhwani followed by the Alarippu, Anwesha right away displayed the fine training she has received at the hands of her guru. Good control over her hand and foot movements made the jathi portions look very pretty and effective. Contributing largely to the general scheme of things was the extremely soulful singing by Swamimalai S. K. Suresh, which not only provided Anwesha enough fodder for a heightened portrayal of emotions but also took the viewers - the few that were present- into the heart of the items. This was true of the Tulsidas bhajan ``Tumaka Chalata Ramachandra'', (sung in a Carnatic flavour) the padam in Sourashtram ``Aduvum Solluval'' and the Varnam ``Manavi '' in Sankarabharanam. Anwesha, might have shown a tendency to be a bit jerky with the attami, but revealed an old world charm with bhava. The beautiful varnam was done with quiet pride, giving the emotions its due and the jatis a lightness making her dance a true celebration. Mention must be made of the sensitive nattuvangam by Urmila, which was forceful without being obtrusive or strident.

B. Muthukumar on the flute followed the same trend of being heard without distracting audience attention.

On the mridangam was Dhananjayan and on the violin N. Sikhamani, both of whom enhanced the show.

CHITRA MAHESH

Send this article to Friends by E-Mail

Entertainment

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Folio |



The Hindu Group: Home | About Us | Copyright | Archives | Contacts | Subscription
Group Sites: The Hindu | Business Line | The Sportstar | Frontline | Home |

Comments to : thehindu@vsnl.com   Copyright 2002, The Hindu
Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the written consent of The Hindu