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Catching the eye!

Tamal Bhattacharya's murals and ceramic sculptures are eye-catching. RANA SIDDIQUI speaks to the artist.



Tamal Bhattacharya's ceramic vases on view in New Delhi.

AT A time when the young breed of artists is rushing towards creating a niche by taking up abstract art without understanding the nuances of the realistic works, young Tamal Bhattacharya from Kolkata is silently advocating the cause of realistic works. And his realistic works don't stand alone; they blend with his favourite medium, ceramic and form murals with it. Tamal is said to be the only artist in the country who has blended canvas and ceramic relief work and formed interesting three-dimensional objects d' art which also qualify as utility and decorative items. Some of these are on display at Palm Court Gallery at India Habitat Centre. This exhibition also qualifies as the first such mural show in the Capital.

In this, one finds a good mix of his canvases merged with ceramic sculptures. That is, his sculptures, mostly human faces expressing love, anger, regret, surprise and sorrow, are extended beyond the canvas. Hence these artworks not only can be used as wall hanging but also as flower pots. He uses ceramic colours on canvas, which makes them "wash-proof and scratch-proof". There are several graphic paintings, panels, partitions, vases, candle stands and many such items. Tamal is a graduate from Santiniketan who has done his Masters from in mural design from M.S. University, Vadodra under the tutelage of K.G. Subramanium, Jogen Chowdhary, P.R. Daroz and Dilip Mitra. "I am inclined towards making murals because they are rooted in history. Take Ajanta Ellora caves, temples and churches for instance," he says. Gods and goddesses also form an integral part of his canvas and ceramic blended works.

"I take inspiration from nature, happenings of everyday life and mythology," says the artist who has made a name for himself by creating a huge ceramic relief mural and a ceramic pillar as part of the Artspace Gardens, Baruipur, Kolkata. Tamal also incorporates modern designs in his works now.

This exhibition of interesting works is on view till this coming Saturday.

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