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A modern, mythical medley



ANOTHER `INVISIBLE' STORY: Ramesh and Pooja in Jithan.

Jithan
Genre: Supernatural thriller
The cast: Sarath Kumar, Ramesh, Pooja, S. Ve. Shekher, Livingston
The director: Vincent Selva
The storyline: An idol found in the sea turns the hero invisible.
The bottom line: A boon frittered away

The Invisible Man keeps surfacing now and then in one or the other language. This time it is in Tamil in Radaan Media Works' `Jithan' (U/A), presented by Supergood Films. The story is Ramgopal Varma's and is based on `Gayab' that had Tusshar Kapoor and Antara Mali in the lead.

Surya (Ramesh) is a young man bullied at home and outside. Introverted and self-conscious, his moments of joy are when he gets a chance to catch a glimpse of Priya (Pooja), the girl he is ardently in love with. It is a case of unrequited passion because Priya is already engaged to the rich Ajay (Mukesh).

A distressed Surya, while standing in the waters of the beach, finds an ancient idol that possesses supernatural qualities. He cries out to the deity that he wishes to vanish, and presto! he turns invisible!

As the timid Surya, new hero Ramesh does a convincing job. The sad yet powerful eyes convey emotions well. But the initial zest that Tusshar showed in `Gayab' does not come across in `Jithan.' Sarath Kumar in a guest role lends dignity and power to the police officer he portrays.

Livingston as the henpecked husband is apt. But Nalini is more a caricature.

Srikanth Deva tries out a remix of Chandrababu's `Kunguma Poovae' — nothing extraordinary. Rerecording could have been softer. Suitably used graphics enhance the impact. The screenplay and direction are Vincent Selva's.

There is an unwarranted sadness about `Jithan.' All the same Vincent has chosen a story that is different and lent it reasonable punch.

Vincent Selva ought to be commended for restricting the hero from going berserk, once he turns invisible. Even the few problems Surya creates appear incongruous, because otherwise he is harmless — seeking love and nothing more.

Hence the thrill you would expect in a film of this genre, is rather missing.

MALATHI RANGARAJAN

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