Online edition of India's National Newspaper
Friday, May 27, 2005

About Us
Contact Us
Entertainment Bangalore
Published on Fridays

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |

Entertainment    Bangalore    Chennai and Tamil Nadu    Delhi    Hyderabad    Thiruvananthapuram   

Printer Friendly Page Send this Article to a Friend

Colours of spirituality

B.S. Desai concentrates on details and moves towards an understanding of the self



RIOT OF COLOURS Desai's exuberant composition

A recent exhibition of paintings by B.S. Desai, along with the colourful durries by his mother Gangabai Desai, received an unprecedented response from connoisseurs of art in Hassan.

Noted artist and art critic C.S. Krishna Shetty, who spoke about the works, noted that they have a spiritual language, which come from the artist's pursuit of yoga and meditation.

The end result is a sumptuous colour orchestration and exuberant compositions. Though some times the subjugated floating forms suggest the presence of some recognisable forms, intentions of the artist is to enhance the vivid mental emotions.

Shetty also notes that each work of Desai evokes a sublime feeling. Film director Kesari Harvoo observed that Desai's works are multi-dimensional and offer multi-interpretations and it is a journey of the mind.

Considering Desai's work as a via media between the real and abstract, Harvoo says that his works are a positive interpretation of nature, as one can see clear a physical path in each of these works.

Noted artist K.T. Shiva Prasad observed that Desai concentrated on minute details and is "moving" towards an understanding of the self. He said that a good work is one, which extends a different experience from that of the others.

Makali, a contemporary of Desai, looking dispassionately at the works of his friend, noted that the works gave him a feeling of textile design.

Artist M.S. Murthy said that his works showed an obsession for texture and therefore it is confused in its narration. In total, it is a work at the surface level. Those who visited the exhibition also enjoyed the durries by Gangabai Desaikoudi. This is one of the many dying art forms of rural Karnataka.

Interestingly, Gangabai never uses a tape or a scale to measure the cloth as she has a perfect sense of measurement ingrained in her.

MURALIDHARA KHAJANE

Printer friendly page  
Send this article to Friends by E-Mail

Entertainment    Bangalore    Chennai and Tamil Nadu    Delhi    Hyderabad    Thiruvananthapuram   

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |


The Hindu Group: Home | About Us | Copyright | Archives | Contacts | Subscription
Group Sites: The Hindu | Business Line | The Sportstar | Frontline | The Hindu eBooks | The Hindu Images | Home |

Comments to : thehindu@vsnl.com   Copyright 2005, The Hindu
Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the written consent of The Hindu