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His artwork is spot on

A.D. RANGARAJAN

Ginne Sagar is set to immortalise popular images with his `Palamur dots' Pointillism technique.



TO THE POINT Ginne Sagar at an art exhibition.

There is nothing uncommon in painting media like watercolour, oil colour and Indian ink. But refill dots is Ginne Sagar's forte. Pointillism, the technique of building pictures from tiny dots of different colours, was developed in France in the late 19th century. Unaware of this fact, he asks, "Is it so?" Though he has been practising the art for the last 21 years.

It was in 1984 that Ginne Venkateswarlu alias Ginne Sagar stumbled upon the idea of putting thousands of pencil dots on canvas to form an image, which was met with an overwhelming response. However, considering the durability of the artwork, he changed the medium from pencil to pen refills.

sFurther widening the scope, he took to multi-colour pens to bring out lively images. And there was no looking back.

Christening it `Palamoor dots', from his native Palamoor (the erstwhile name of Mahabubnagar), Sagar makes the grainy dots in his pictures reveal silent emotions. The process of making a portrait or a scenery, which involves a lot of patience and concentration, takes a week's time for him, with a hard toil of five hours a day.

"A dot at the wrong place or a wrong coloured dot at the right place will spoil the image. So every dot matters," he smiles.Venkateswarlu is working as a teaching faculty in traditional painting at the TTD's Sri Venkateswara Institute of Traditional Sculpture and Architecture (SVITSA), Tirupati, which is one of the only two such centres in the country that offer training in traditional sculpture, the other being at Mahabalipuram (Mamallapuram) near Chennai. Besides painting, the other courses offered in the institute are architecture and sculpture in wood, cement, stone and metal media, which are recognised by State board of technical education and training.

Now, Sagar has yet another feather in his cap. In a compilation on Union Cabinet-2005 being brought out by Jaipur-based Manish Media Agency, Sagar is drawing the portraits (of course, with dots) of the hundred cabinet members and senior politicians, including the UPA chairperson, Sonia Gandhi and prime minister, Manmohan Singh.

He has so far drawn 300 pictures and exhibited them in 20 exhibitions across the country and in inter-university youth festivals, but not once has he put his art works for sale. His grievance is that painting competitions do not even consider Pointillism as a medium and confine to watercolours and Indian ink and others. At least after this cabinet project, I hope the Government will consider dot painting as a medium," he says.

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