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It's melody all the way

B. RAMADEVI

It was an aural extravaganza at `Isai Amudham - 2006,' organised by Shanmukhananda Sangeetha Sabha, Tirupur, recently.



PLEASING AND PERFECT: N. Ravikiran . Photo: M. Balaji.

It was an assembly of child prodigies. N. Ravikiran at the centre with his chitravina, Akkarai Subbulakshmi with the violin, Master Satyanarayana with the keyboard, Umayalpuram Sivaraman with the mridangam and Sri Sundar Kumar with the kanjira filled the stage at Jaivabai Higher Secondary School, Tirupur, raising expectation. The occasion was `Isai Amudham - 2006,' organised by Shanmukhananda Sangeetha Sabha.

The programme started with `Evari Bodhana,' a varnam in Abhogi by Pattanam Subramania Iyer in vilamba kala and picked up tremendous speed soon.

"Gajananayutham Ganeshwaram'' by Dikshitar in Vegavahini followed majestically. During the alapana, neraval and swaraprastharas, Ravikiran encouraged Master Satyanarayana to contribute effectively.

Aural and rhythmic

While the audience was overwhelmed by the way Master Satyanarayana produced complicated phrases following Ravikiran, the little master himself went about his business nonchalantly, without a trace of self consciousness. Umayalpuram Sivaraman's mridangam was an aural extravaganza in rhythm. The mridangist, with 60 years of experience, could clearly bring out the swaras in his mridangam and even untrained ears could identify them.

"Raghuvamsa Sudhambudhi Chandra'' in Kadhana Kuthoohalam sparkled with speed, variety and spontaneity. Then came the special composition based on the technique, "Melharmony." This innovative method brings together the `melody' of the east with the `harmony' of the west. Ravikiran presented a piece in Keeravani, set to `tisra gathi.'

It was meant to be played by 100 artistes, but Ravikiran's troupe could bring out a near-perfect effect with the help of the keyboard that produced the sounds of the trumpet, the saxophone, the piano, the bassoon and the flute.

"Brochevarevarura'' in Khamas by Mysore Vasudevachar was enchanting, followed by the unforgettable performance of Umayalpuram Sivaraman. Sri Sundar Kumar's kanjira was equally lively. Akkarai Subbulakshmi's violin was melody incarnate and she followed Ravikiran with ease in pure classical, semi-classical and western compositions.

Towards the end, Ravikiran played a philosophic song, "Vidhiyin Vindhai Arindhavar Yaaro'' and concluded with the galloping Thiruppugazh, "Muthai Tharu Pathi Thirunagai."

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