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Holding a mirror to society

Here is a chance to watch masterpieces from the renowned Russian director, Andrei Tarkovsky



AT THE HELM Akira Kurosawa called Tarkovsky "a poet in cinema"

He has inspired generations of filmmakers including Steven Soderberg who remade his Solaris into a cerebral science fiction movie of the same name. Andrei Tarkovsky, the visionary Russian filmmaker, won the Golden Lion for his debut feature, Ivan's Childhood. Ingmar Bergman said of Tarkovsky: "The greatest, the one who invented a new language, true to the nature of film, as it captures life as a reflection, life as a dream." Akira Kurosawa calls him "a poet in cinema. His unusual sensitivity is both overwhelming and astounding."

Though he never tackled politics directly, his metaphysical musings earned him the wrath of the authorities.

Like most artists in the Soviet Union his creative process was constantly hampered by run ins with authority.

His Nostalghia, which he shot in Italy, (1983) was oddly prescient. He had to leave Russia in exile and lived in Italy. His last film was Sacrifice, which was shot by Bergman's cinematographer Sven Nykwist. During the filming, Tarkovsky was diagnosed with cancer and the post-production work was done in a hospital in Paris.

The good news for all cinema buffs is the Bangalore based film society, Collective Chaos, is holding a three-day festival of Tarkovsky's filmsfrom February 17 to 19 at Gurunanak Bhavan, Vasanth Nagar.

Filmmaker Prakash Belavadi said Tarkovsky's historical diploma film and four rare documentaries on him, including Alexandr Sokurov's Moscow Elegy and Chris Marker's A Day in the Life of Andrei Arsenevich, would be screened during the festival.

The society, which was established in 2003 and has screened over 250 films, has organised the festival in association with the Department of Youth Services and Sports and Sun Microsystems.

The films slated to be screened during the festival are: February 17- The Steamroller and the Violin (Noon), Ivan's Childhood (2 p.m.) and Andrei Rublev (4.15 p.m.). February 18 - Solaris (10 a.m.), Mirror (2 p.m.), Stalker (4.15 p.m) and Moscow Elegy (documentary-7.30 p.m.). February 19- Voyage in Time (a documentary by Tarkovsky and Tonino Guverra - 10 a.m.), Nostalghia (11.30 a.m.), Sacrifice (2.30 p.m.), Directed by Andrei Tarkovsky (a documentary by Michal Leszcylowski-5.30 p.m.) and A Day in the Life of Andrei Arsenevich (a documentary) 7.45 p.m.

For more details, visit www. Collectivechaos.org or call 25203932, 57653858, 9844358234.

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