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    Top physicist wants Indian participation in Japanese projects

    Mumbai (PTI): Japanese scientists are looking forward to greater participation by Indian scientists at their mega projects of the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics (KEK), a top Japanese particle physicist said.

    KEK, one of the two largest particle physics laboratories around the globe, is planning for a highest luminosity machine (accelerator) to explore matter and anti-matter of the universe and their decay properties soon after the Big Bang.

    The new project is called KEKB.

    "We want more Indian scientists' participation in this multi-million project as well as another new project on Electron-Proton Accelerator which is at a design stage," KEK director general Prof. A Suzuki told PTI.

    Both these are international collaborative projects and it is important that scientists from across India should participate, he said.

    Prof. Suzuki and Prof. Rolf-Dieter Heuer, director general, European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva, were here last week to attend the two-day 'Bhabha summit' at the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, which is celebrating its founder Homi J. Bhabha's birth centenary.

    Prof. Suzuki noted that in the field of particle physics there are two complementary approaches to unravel the mystery and beauty of the universe.

    The first one is to go for high luminosity enhancing the chance of detecting the signature of massive, yet-to-be discovered particles that can appear for a short time in the quantum-mechanical loops. This is the KEK model accelerator.

    The second way is to raise the energy of interaction and by doing so to increase the possibility of observing new particles that are directly accessible, Prof. Suzuki said.

    Meanwhile, Prof. Heuer said attending the Bhabha summit gave him a lot of insights of the great physicist of India, who spear-headed India's nuclear programme and was equally involved in the fundamental research on cosmic rays and high energy physics.

    Asked when would the much awaited Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world's largest and highest-energy particle accelerator built by CERN which was shut down nine days after it was switched on in September last, become operational once again, he said, "It will restart at the end of September or October and made available to scientists around the world."

    The CERN director general said that the $10 billion Geneva-based accelerator which was switched off after it suffered an electrical failure resulting in compete shut down.

    Last November, CERN revealed that the repairs were expected to have a price tag of $21 million in order to get the collider up and running again.

    "Although the repair will cost us a lot, this accident has helped us develop new instruments that could detect before hand the occurrence of any untoward," Prof. Heur said.

    This accelerator is very important for the scientists to explore the universe, 95 per cent of which is yet unknown to mankind, he said.

    Once the LHC is repaired and becomes operational, two exciting things will be experienced the science of fundamental particles of universe and technology for prevention of such accidents in the accelerators.

    The LHC is over 27 km in circumference and lies underneath the Franco-Swiss border in Geneva, Switzerland. It was both funded and built in collaboration with over 10,000 scientists and engineers from over 100 countries laboratories and universities.

    By sending beams of protons around the 17-mile ring of the LHC and crashing them into one another, the scientists hope to recreate the immediate after effects of a proposed Big Bang.

    The results of this experiment, they believe, will provide the secrets of the origin of the universe.


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