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Sunday, Mar 30, 2003

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Kolkata


ON April 2 Kolkata will feel the pulsating beats of global percussion as British Council presents Peter Lockett, one of UK's most versatile multi-percussionists, in performance at the Kala Mandir. Lockett has mastered percussion and drums from every part of the globe and he will be touring India with his group, Network of Sparks. The tour is an extensive collaboration with India musicians from Northern and Southern Hindustani and Karnatic traditions. Truly an adventure in sound and one that intrepid music lover in the city must experience. Lockett will also hold a workshop at the Sangit Research Academy on April 1 where Tanmoy Bose, Bikram Ghosh and other Indian maestros will join him.

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HE may have shot to fame with his sensitive novels like Afternoon Raga, but Amit Chaudhuri is also a fine exponent of Indian Classical music. Not only is he a scholar of this tradition, but a superb vocalist. It is the maestro who will speak on March 31 at Seagull Media Research Centre in an event titled: An Evening of Indian Classical Music: a Session with Amit Chaudhuri. The event is the first in a series of interactive programmes featuring leading Indian Classical musicians.

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CONTINUING with their series of exhibitions on Forgotten Pioneers of Modern Bengal Art, Galerie 88 presents the works of Radha Charan Bagchi (1910-1977). A graduate of the Government College of Art just before World War II, this versatile artist's aesthetic trajectory traces a rapid movement from one medium to medium, from one school to another. He has worked in oil, tempura and watercolour; but dry point graphics, etchings and lithographs can also be found in his portfolio.


He is equally at ease in the neo-Bengal school style; as in conventional European traditions. Most interesting are those works where the artist is seen to be struggling to find a a Western technique framework that could accommodate Indian themes.

Thought-provoking works and on display till April 5.

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LONDON-based artist Hendrik Wittkopf has spent the last decade capturing the changing face of Kolkata on canvas. The project began a good 10 years ago and over several subsequent visits, during the course of which the very name of the city changed, Wittkopf documented the changing cityscape as he saw it in his paintings. The artist is back again, this time to display his works in an exhibition at the Max Muller Bhavan on till April 4.

ARUNDHATI RAY

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