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Sunday, May 04, 2003

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Better now


AS books go this one is as different from his first as chalk from cheese. But that is exactly how Ardashir Vakil, author of One Day planned it. "I am a more confident writer now and know what I can work on," said Vakil while in India for the launch of his new book. He said he had consciously avoided a theme similar to his earlier book, Beach Boy though he was at one point tempted to work on a sequel. In the country of his birth after a gap of 20 years, Vakil said he was somewhat dismayed by the conspicuous consumption of the middle class. "The condition of the masses remains unchanged even today," he added. Vakil, who teaches at a girls' school in London, said that it took him two years to write the book since it was not something he did full time. Vakil said he did not find a "flowering of arts" in this country and claimed that Mumbai as a city was "unrecognisable" with its multiplexes.

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