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Making serious music

They are a band of boys who got together to make serious music and went on to bag the Best Alternative Album at the Grammy Awards 2002. Coldplay is here with a new album A rush of blood to the head for the alternative genre.

IT'S ABOUT a band that brought four people together, to make soulful music with absolute honesty and passion. "We were trying to say that there is an alternative'" says singer Chris Martin of the group Coldplay which won the 2002 Grammy Award in the `Best Alternative Album'. The band members, Chris Martin, Will Champion , Guy Berryman and Jonny Buckland, met at University College, London, during their first week as students. Chris and Jonny began writing songs and Guy, liking what he heard, joined on the bass moving on to drums later. All four had a passion for music and a quiet determination, rehearsing almost every night in the basement and in the park.

They recorded a four track EP in 1998, which got them a gig at the `In the city' music festival at Manchester. Two years later their debut album Parachutes was released comprising a collection of direct, soulful and utterly beautiful songs that won them the `Band of the year 2000' by the UK press, five NME awards including Best Band and Best Single and nominations for Brit awards for Best Group, Best Album and Best New Comer categories apart from selling five million copies worldwide.

And now they are back with the album A rush of blood to the head, reigning at the No.1 position on the Billboards heat seeker chart.

The album features eleven fresh tracks recorded at Parr Street studios, Liverpool and AIR studios London. Although recognizably Coldplay, the album comes up more energetic and up-tempo. "We have grown up a bit, travelled a lot more, and met many people. Musically too, we've heard more from

The Bunnymen, The Cure, PJ Harvey, Nick Cave and New Order. The last two years we've been like a cultural sponge. We have sucked it all in and now it's coming out on the record," says Chris. In fact, he went to Haiti with Oxfam, on a gruelling long journey over rough country roads to meet farming communities effected by the fluctuations in the world coffee market and cheap rice imports, in support of their campaign to change the world trade rules. Very much alive and rooted in the present, the band has undercurrents of the global order that are reflected in their music. "Anyone in our position has a certain responsibility. Odd though it may seem to us, a lot of people read what we're saying, see us on television, buy our records and read the sleeves, and that can be a great platform.

You can make people aware of the issues. It isn't much effort for us at all. But if it can help people, then we want to do it," says Guy Berryman.

With conviction, honesty and an alternative genre as their USP, Coldplay is one contemporary group devoted to making some serious music.

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