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Flair for fine art

Shrishti 2003, an exhibition of paintings by children, shows that talent can be tapped at a young age


OVER 300 paintings with themes inspired by animals, kings, gods and Nature filled the brightly-lit hall of the Lalit Kala Akademi. Sri Annai Kamakshi Kalaikoodam is holding Shrishti 2003, an exhibition of works by its students as part of its endeavour to encourage art among children.

The paintings on show are categorised according to the age of the artist. Each painting is neatly framed providing information about the medium used, name of the artist and his or her photograph.

"Seeing their work on show at an exhibition will inspire them to take up art more seriously. This is one of the reasons behind this event," says Venkatachalapathy, founder of the institute.


Around 32 paintings in different mediums such as oil, poster, water colours, Tanjore paintings, stained glass, calligraphy, pastels, pencil shading and collage that are displayed, show that with appropriate training, talent can be tapped at a young age. There are also paintings by signboard artists and housewives for whom the training is imparted at the institute.

However, the painting of Napolean Bonaparte, which Venkatachalapathy says took eight months to complete, and the neatly framed Taj Mahal by a seven-year-old are the highlights.


Paintings by children from Udavum Karangal are also on display. "I want people to give importance to art in schools, which is what I wish to convey through this exhibition," says the fine arts graduate from the Government College of Fine Arts. Started in1996, the institute has over 1000 students across 10 centres in the city.

The works of Venkatachalapathy done when he was a child, are also featured. Each painting states the age when he painted it. "It was always my ambition to become an artist, but the opportunity to pursue formal training in art came late in life. Hence, I want to show the difference between a trained hand and an untrained one." The exhibition is on till 7 p.m. this evening.

PRASSANA SRINIVASAN

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