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Kool dude, hot babe look!


Wrote William Shakespeare: "An attire showeth a man from a pauper to a king'. This seems to be the mantra of Generation-X.

'A person is known by the company he keeps' - the adage is passe now. For now, one's wardrobe speaks for his personality and lifestyle. Modern life demands a congenial blend of comfort and style. Fabrics that feel good and give that elegant look to pamper the body are today's needs.

In the 19th century, women's magazines brought fashion trends to the fore and even offered inexpensive patterns. In the 20th century, as movies and television gained popularity, stars became international idols and trendsetters. Then came the obsession with the pop stars. They sported radical styles, which were immediately picked up by the youth.

Today, little has changed, as advertisers make effective use of fashion shows, glossy magazines, billboards, shop windows and TV advertisements to generate the hype for style and fashion. The obsession to look like a 'kool' dude or a 'hot' babe is, of course, to follow the current Bollywood and MTV trend. And if you can master the style, you have qualified to be called the 'fashion guru'!

While streets of Mumbai and New Delhi are teeming with the high priests of fashion of the likes of Rohit Bals and Ritu Kumars, the South is fast catching up with the latest trends from the world of fashion.


"When I first started my boutique in Vizag three years ago, I had a lot of apprehensions about the success of my venture. But slowly, the 'fashion' bug has smitten the youth in the city who no longer hesitate to experiment with style and latest fashion wares," says Anita Pawar who runs 'Prapancha'. The twinkling notes and the ethnic backdrops of the boutique radiate a happy energy. It's perfectly in sync with the wide array of colourful fabrics displayed around.

Anita has tied up with a few designers from Pune and Mumbai who also supply to the bigger outlets like Shopper's Stop and Pantaloons. "Cottons work best for the climate of the city. So I have a wider collection of the fabric in the latest styles and patterns," she says.

An ethnic blend of Indo-Western style seems to be the latest craze with the youth in the city. The exquisite embroidery or sequence work done on the short kurtas bring a whiff of fresh air. Intense, classic, festive and feminine but never over the top - these new designs make their debut this season as an ultimate ode to feminine grace.

The smart printed cotton trousers with a sleek touch of embroidery when teamed with a short kurta can give not only an elegant and rich look but also add extra zing to the couture. In some creations, the embroidery is elaborate - up to the waist and subtly exposed with slits.

Moving away from the preponderance of white and black, Anita's collection takes on glorious colourations. Brights are in, and so are florals, she asserts. While she emphasises on traditional craftsmanship, she has an array of inventive flairs in her collection.

Who said designer clothes are only for the ones who are ready to empty their pockets? "The dress ranges from Rs.290 to Rs.3,500," says Anita. "Jute and Khadi kurtas with a slight touch of sequence are much in vogue and sport that bright look, ideal for the festive season." These just add a dash of modernity with stress on comfort.

Elegant kurtas with slim trousers, complemented by stylish stoles, enable you to have that gorgeous look suitable for any occasion!

The trendy line of lightweight junk jewellery is hallmarked. Be they bracelets, earrings, anklets or rings, the designs are sleek. Her collection includes brands like 'Mayabazaar', 'Desi', 'Indus Tree', etc.

When you buy a 'Mayabazaar' product, you not only get a unique piece of jewellery, you also help to save a traditional craft from extinction. 'Mayabazaar' works are done by craftspersons from Uttar Pradesh using a painstaking technique called charakkam to combine modern design with traditional Indian handicraft.

Trendy and bright coloured bags are another hit with the young crowd. The Tibetan monk bags priced between Rs.195 and Rs.210 have been much in demand.

So, when you catch yourself feeling blue staring at your wardrobe next time, pull out the credit cards and try some retail therapy. There's a whole new "fashion world" being created just for you.

NIVEDITA GANGULY

Photo: K.R. Deepak

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