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Children's newspaper with a mix of good things

GEETHA BALACHANDRAN

Celebrating ten years, the children's newspaper Mon Quotidien has much to cheer about.



MY DAILY: Colourful mix of stories, cartoons and hard news.

It was celebration time in a Paris newspaper office a few weeks ago, though a muted one. The occasion was the 10th birthday of Mon Quotidien, claimed to be the only daily newspaper for children in the western world.

France has more than a dozen children's weeklies, which combine illustrated stories with articles on nature, history and science as well as cartoons and games. But there was no daily newspaper for kids until Mon Quotidien (meaning "My daily") began publication 10 years ago in the Marais, Paris.

Successful venture

The newspaper has a print run of 65,000 copies and caters mostly to children 10 to 14 years old, is delivered every day mostly to households across the country. It provides a colourful mix of hard news, human-interest stories, cartoons and novelty items like "Word of the day".

Francois Dufour, is the founder and editor-in-chief of Mon Quotidien. In 1995, he began publication of Mon Quotidien with profits from a successful venture in educational quiz cards. He says the newspaper's motto is "show the truth".

Edit meetings

To keep in touch with its readership, the newspaper management invites three youngsters twice a week to the morning "editorial meeting".

During the hour-long interaction, staffers present a list of foreign and domestic stories being considered for the next edition; and it is for the children to say what they want on the paper and why.

To be on the editorial team for a day, children are required to call a number printed in the newspaper. They are then chosen on a "first come, first served" basis.

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